November 10, 2019

Weeknote CW46 (S1E5) Writers strike edition

Let’s just pretend it hasn’t been weeks and weeks and jump right in.

This week was mostly about refining the content and preparing the slides and other things I need to deliver our new public training next week. We also had a stack of proposals and tenders to respond to.

Since the last weeknote (ahem) several of my crew have been promoted, which is awesome. From my point of view, this is great because now I have more people who are formally allowed to run projects and more people who are director-level and can make whole-of-office decisions, not just project decisions.

Also, new blog and host. It’s pretty great.

What held me back?

What held me back? Events. Lots of proposal prep, some business development and just day-to-day stuff kept creeping in. Doing new content needs hard thinking and every other task brings a switching cost to get back to my main thread for the week.

What got in my way?

Come on, weeknote question chooser. This is the same question as the first one.

What did I do this week that I do every week?

The light sprinkling of meetings we have to keep the company aligned nationally are key milestones in my week. They feel less-than-essential while they’re happening, but with four offices, formal meetings are the only way to maintain the sort of continual peripheral awareness that you get for free if you’re co-located.

How will I behave differently?

I really need to find a way to firewall time in my days. And I need a trigger to get into the sort of head space required to create content and make the kind of structural decisions that go with it.

What will I do tomorrow?

Tomorrow is a good day to finish the workshop content and get the canvases I need printed!


weeknote


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